Annual Carbon Reduction Plan 2012 – 5. The Carbon Reduction Plan 2012/3

5.0 The Carbon Reduction Plan 2012/13

5.1 Taking Action on Buildings and Energy – Changing the way in which
energy is used, conserved, generated and distributed for the City’s buildings

5.1.1 The Council’s use of energy through its buildings accounts for 71% of the
authority’s overall emissions.

5.1.2 The Buildings and Energy Strategy sets out three key strands of activity: Asset Rationalisation (disposal and demolition of inefficient buildings), Capital Works and Cultural Change, supported by a series of enabling objectives that will create the right conditions for delivering the low-carbon capital projects required, which are listed below.

5.2 Actions for 2012/13
There are five principal types of activity set out in the Buildings and Energy Action
Plan for 2012/13: Rationalisation, Capital Projects (estate-wide and building type-
specific), Cultural Change and Enabling.

5.2.1 Rationalisation
 Work in 2011/12 has provided the platform for making more efficient use of space and further reducing the number of buildings in the estate in 2012/13, the Council will save around 1,462 tonnes of CO2 [These estimated amounts are subject to change due to changes in closure dates, fluctuations in network transportation costs, building usage, occupancy hours, weather conditions, estimated billing, unforeseen credit re-billing, debit re-billing, delayed billing, and billing anomalies by utility companies.]

5.2.2 Estate-wide capital projects
 Asset Management Plan. The asset management plan for 2012/13 includes roof insulation at Wythenshawe Forum, boiler replacement at Levenshulme leisure centre and heating works at Wythenshawe Horticultural Centre
 Voltage optimizers. A shortlist of 5/6 new locations for voltage optimizers will be selected and delivered this year from ten potential sites identified. From the ten, total potential savings of around 682 tonnes of CO2 could be achieved, requiring upfront investment of approximately £600,000.
 Smart meters (Automatic Meter Readings). This year 40 buildings in the estate suitable for gas meters will have them installed.
 Heating controls. For 2012/13 it is crucial that the significant savings achieved over the last two years are monitored to ensure they are maintained going forwards, as it would otherwise be easy to lose these benefits. All sites with Building Management Systems will therefore undergo an annual audit which may also identify additional savings for the year.

5.2.3 Building type-specific actions
 Buildings will be targeted by their type, in order to identify consistent, replicable approaches to energy savings which fit with a ‘building types’ design, use and occupancy. The chart below shows the contribution each type of building made in 2011 to the Council’s overall buildings emissions.

acrp2012fig5

5.2.4 The key actions for each group of buildings are as follows:

5.2.4.1 Leisure (39% of building emissions)
 There are proposals for new joint service centres in Chorlton and Levenshulme and a new-build leisure centre in Beswick, which would all replace older, more inefficient, buildings. These provide substantial opportunities for low-carbon developments over the coming years.
 Work will commence this year to embed low-carbon principles into the brief and design of the Chorlton and Beswick facilities to ensure they are sustainably built.
 The co-location of Hulme Library into Moss Side Leisure Centre is expected to reduce combined energy consumption from both sites and the designs will be reviewed for any additional energy saving opportunities.
 An energy audit will be undertaken at Abraham Moss Leisure Centre (with Crumpsall Library due to be incorporated into the leisure footprint), and this will identify opportunities that could be scaled up across the leisure estate.
 Manchester Sport and Leisure Trust will install a new pool cover, efficient lighting
and passive infrared sensors this year as part of their low-carbon plan.
 Manchester Sport & Leisure Trust’s 5 directly managed sites will each undergo an energy review.

5.2.4.2 Offices (11% of building emissions)
 Recommendations from the Alexandra House energy audit will be assessed and where appropriate, implemented as part of the asset management plan works.
 An energy audit will be conducted at an office building to be identified.
 A newly acquired office building will have environmental and energy efficiency principles embedded within its refurbishment brief.

5.2.4.3 Markets (11% of building emissions)
 Low-carbon design principles will be embedded into the design of a new fish market at New Smithfield Market (NSM), which will replace an older, inefficient, market building.
 NSM will also reduce energy consumption through the replacement of 7 over-sized chlorifiers with water heaters, plus rewiring and roof replacement works.
 NSM is also on the short-list, depending upon feasibility, to have a voltage optimizer installed to further reduce energy use.

5.2.4.4 Community centres (including Sure Start centres) (9% of building emissions)
 A large proportion of these buildings are currently under review and those decisions regarding their future will therefore inform how best to tackle and reduce energy consumption.

5.2.4.5 Municipal (8% of building emissions)
 The implementation of the Town Hall Complex Transformation Programme will continue throughout 2012/13, with staff then relocating to the refurbished, energy efficient Town Hall Extension next year.
 An EU project is under development to deploy smart energy systems as part of the refurbishment to undertake detailed monitoring and analysis of energy consumption.

5.2.4.6 Depots/warehouses (8% of building emissions)
 An energy audit will be undertaken of the Sharp building for creative businesses
that will also assess opportunities to minimise energy use of the Council’s data
centre.
 A user-education project will also be developed for the Council’s main depots to reduce energy consumption through the actions of stakeholders, due to the limited opportunities to make physical improvements to the fabric of depot buildings.

5.2.4.7 Galleries/museums (6% of building emissions)
 Manchester Art Gallery will complete its roll-out of LED lighting in the remaining 18 of its 20 galleries by October 2012, which will save 116 tonnes CO2 and £23,000 this year.
 A further 24 tonnes CO2 will be saved through implementation of the Art Gallery’s light management strategy.
 The Gallery’s detailed energy audit will continue to be delivered and will include
pilots in adjusting temperature parameters, utilising different entrances and completing occupancy surveys, to identify optimal ways to save energy. The audit is due to be completed by December 2012 and will produce business cases for spend-to-save investment in the Gallery’s heating and cooling plant and building fabric.

5.2.4.8 Residential care (5% of building emissions)
 Analysis will be undertaken of residential buildings and high users will be targeted through the relevant services (Adults and Children’s Services). High users can then be targeted in order to review capital measures; lighting and heating plant will be significant contributors to energy consumption in these types of buildings.

5.2.4.9 Libraries (2% of building emissions)
 Further analysis of the libraries estate will be undertaken in order to identify what interventions may be required to target high consumers.

5.2.4.10 Cemeteries/crematorium (1% of building emissions)
 Work has already been completed over recent years to ensure efficient use of Manchester’s crematoriums; this year they will be benchmarked and analysed for further energy-saving opportunities.

5.2.5 Enabling actions:
5.2.5.1 Work with supply chain/framework – to ensure they understand the Council’s carbon reduction aims and develop the knowledge and skills to deliver low- carbon projects for the authority as the norm. Information from the energy audits will be shared across the framework.

5.2.5.2 Carbon impact of capital projects – a project will be undertaken to identify, implement and roll out a calculation tool for capital projects. This will enable project managers to assess the carbon impact of the projects and to ensure that those involved in the design, construction and management of the building can make informed decisions to minimise the building’s carbon emissions.

5.2.5.3 Energy efficiency information will be incorporated into condition surveys on the estate from this year. These will gather information to identify further opportunities across the estate and inform scheduled works such as the asset management plan at the relevant time.

5.3 Taking Action on Transport and Mobility
5.3.1 The Council’s activity results in carbon emissions from a range of sources, including commuting by officers and members, travel at work (e.g. to meetings), and use of fleet vehicles as an integral part of delivering services. The Council is keen to lead by example, to reduce its own direct carbon emissions, and encourage its employees and members to do the same particularly when commuting.

5.3.2 Highways, including street lighting
Work planned for the next 12 months includes:
 To develop the programme of replacing existing illuminated bollards and signs with LED apparatus, led by the street lighting PFI Service Provider
 Continue investigations into the feasibility of LED technology being utilised within the exterior street lighting environment.
 Establish an LED retrofit options and costs analysis.

5.3.3 Reducing the need to travel
The Council will:
 Continue to offer flexible working, working from home, remote working, and ‘smarter’ working, subject to operational requirements.
 Publicise facilities for tele/video conferencing and install facilities in all new/refurbished Council buildings wherever practicable.

5.2.4.9 Libraries (2% of building emissions)
 Further analysis of the libraries estate will be undertaken in order to identify what
interventions may be required to target high consumers.

5.2.4.10 Cemeteries/crematorium (1% of building emissions)
 Work has already been completed over recent years to ensure efficient use of
Manchester’s crematoriums; this year they will be benchmarked and analysed for
further energy-saving opportunities.

5.2.5 Enabling actions:
5.2.5.1 Work with supply chain/framework – to ensure they understand the
Council’s carbon reduction aims and develop the knowledge and skills to deliver low-
carbon projects for the authority as the norm. Information from the energy audits will
be shared across the framework.

5.2.5.2 Carbon impact of capital projects – a project will be undertaken to identify,
implement and roll out a calculation tool for capital projects. This will enable project
managers to assess the carbon impact of the projects and to ensure that those
involved in the design, construction and management of the building can make
informed decisions to minimise the building’s carbon emissions.

5.2.5.3 Energy efficiency information will be incorporated into condition surveys on
the estate from this year. These will gather information to identify further
opportunities across the estate and inform scheduled works such as the asset
management plan at the relevant time.

5.3 Taking Action on Transport and Mobility

5.3.1 The Council’s activity results in carbon emissions from a range of sources,
including commuting by officers and members, travel at work (e.g. to meetings), and
use of fleet vehicles as an integral part of delivering services. The Council is keen to
lead by example, to reduce its own direct carbon emissions, and encourage its
employees and members to do the same particularly when commuting.

5.3.2 Highways, including street lighting
Work planned for the next 12 months includes:
 To develop the programme of replacing existing illuminated bollards and signs
with LED apparatus, led by the street lighting PFI Service Provider
 Continue investigations into the feasibility of LED technology being utilised within
the exterior street lighting environment.
 Establish an LED retrofit options and costs analysis.

5.3.3 Reducing the need to travel
The Council will:
 Continue to offer flexible working, working from home, remote working, and
‘smarter’ working, subject to operational requirements.
 Publicise facilities for tele/video conferencing and install facilities in all new/refurbished Council buildings wherever practicable.

5.3.4 Delivering modal shift
The Council will continue to implement and improve Get on Board, the Council’s staff travel plan. It will:
 Include travel facilities e.g. cycle racks, changing facilities, car club space in all new/refurbished Council buildings (wherever practicable), in partnership with the Neighbourhood Delivery Teams.
 Double staff car club membership, as well as geographic spread of vehicles particularly outside the city centre including Etrop Court (Wythenshawe) and Alexandra House (Hulme)
 Continue to offer pool bikes and cycle mileage payments
 The bike to work scheme will aim to achieve its 1000th application and generate a greater income and savings (2011/12 figure = £5000)
 A Bicycle User Group will be set up within the Council
 Final designs for the cycling facilities at the Town Hall Extension will be confirmed.
 Annual season passes and interest free loans will continue to be made available, to exceed the 2011/12 figure of 511.

5.3.5 Council fleet
The Council will lead by ensuring improved performance of the Council’s fleet to reduce emissions, including:
 Identifying opportunities for trialling and rolling out alternative fuels, locally produced bio fuels and electric vehicles within the Council’s, and partners’, own fleets
 Recommending speed limiting vehicles to 60mph whenever practicable
 Design 1 day training programme on fuel efficiency
 Only procure most fuel-efficient fleet such as vehicles with Euro 5 engines, including within all tenders for vehicle purchases a green fleet statement actively seeking contractors and manufacturers to quote for alternatively fuelled vehicles.
Notwithstanding the above, Fleet Services are not planning significant changes to fleet or practices over the next 12 months due to financial constraints. Over the next 12 months, no new vehicles are likely to be purchased and, where vehicles (normally vans) are hired to meet needs to replace vehicles, they will be Euro 5 standard and less than 110 CO2 g/km.

5.3.6 GM Infrastructure Investment
The Local Sustainable Transport Fund programme to be delivered by TfGM includes:
 A range of walking and cycling initiatives including 3 city centre cycle centres, and other cycling facilities & support, and storage grants for employers
 Smart ticketing
 Real-time travel information
 Targeted community transport schemes
 Technology-led traffic management improvements (including diverting cars around, instead of through, the city centre).

5.4 Taking Action on the Consumption and Production of Goods and Services – developing a culture of sustainable consumption within the Council

5.4.1 Although the work outlined below does not contribute significantly to reducing
the Council’s direct emissions, it is included here to demonstrate the impact on
embedded emissions, as well as culture change both within and without the Council.

5.4.2 Work is on-going to calculate the embedded emissions related to procurement
category areas such as food. The following actions will be coordinated by the
Sustainable Consumption Steering Group in 2012:

5.4.3 Buying Sustainably
This year the Council will:
 Hold a review of the Sustainable Procurement Policy, and refresh the Sustainable
Procurement Policy and align the policy with consumption and production
principles.
 Train staff involved in procurement in carbon impacts of procurement, and be
actively engaged in supply chain engagement and development.
 Support services to purchase low carbon technologies, as demand develops.
 Include sustainability targets (KPI’s) and specifications in high carbon impact
contracts such as energy, transport, food, waste and construction.
 Measure the impacts of the Sustainable Procurement Policy in relation to carbon
impacts.
 Support business and regional networks, (via programmes such as the
Environmental Business Pledge and ENWORKS) to establish levels of knowledge
and promote sustainability and carbon reduction to all our suppliers.

5.4.4 Sustainable Food
The sustainable food agenda will continue to grow in both importance and reach across Greater Manchester and this will continue in 2012 by:
 Further developing with partners the Food Futures programme, including carrying out a Forum on Sustainable Food in 2012 and take forward the recommendations of the Expert Panel where applicable.
 Continuing the development of low carbon school menus, offer the sustainable soup project to other schools who express interest and continue to have Meat- free Mondays’ and Fish Fridays.
 Supporting the implementation and coordination of the Sustainable Food Delivery Plan in 2012 and further develop the aspirational actions in the plan.
 Commissioning a baseline study of Manchester’s sustainable consumption and production of food in 2012 / 13.

5.4.5 Waste Management
 The Council will work with Greater Manchester Waste Development Agency to increase domestic recycling rates in an upward trend to meet the Governments national target of 33% of household waste to be recycled by 2015, and EU Waste Framework Directive target of 50% of household waste recycled by 2020.
 The Council will support the diversion of food waste back into the supply chain at New Smithfield Market (NSM) through the Fareshare Project aiming to divert up to 30% of traders fruit and vegetables to Fareshare for distribution.
 Manchester Markets will reduce the overall amount of waste going to landfill at New Smithfield Market (NSM) by 33% in 2012.

5.5 Taking Action on Green and Blue Spaces

5.5.1 As the climate changes, the ability to retain and enhance the city’s landscape will be vital in adapting the city to the climate challenges ahead such as providing shade and natural cooling to buildings, reducing the need for mechanical cooling. Despite not having a large impact on the Council’s direct emissions, the city-wide implications for incidental carbon reduction are much wider.

5.5.2 Green and blue spaces are the life support system of the city. Manchester has
over 150 parks and open spaces, 5 river valleys and 3 canals, as well as many other
important types of green and blue infrastructure including gardens, street trees and
green roofs.

5.5.3 In 2012/13 the Council will deliver of a Green and Blue Infrastructure
Framework for Manchester. This will act as a catalyst for effective delivery and
monitoring, data capture and further research which will impact across all outputs
positively. It will also be the key driver in encouraging the delivery of neighbourhood
focussed Green and Blue Infrastructure planning.

5.5.4 When the first Manchester Green Infrastructure (GI) Framework, the first Meanwhile Strategy and complete the formal site designations of its first Country Park and 2 New Local Nature Reserves (LNR) are successfully delivered, 2012/13 could be a seminal year in relation to GI in Manchester.

5.5.5 Headline Actions 2012/13:
 Work with partners from across the city to produce a Green and Blue Infrastructure Strategy, setting out how Manchester will invest to improve the quality and quantity of these key resources by 2020. The strategy will act as a catalyst for effective delivery, monitoring, and further research into the economic and social value of our green and blue infrastructure, which is critical to the City’s future growth and wellbeing.
 Finalise the Meanwhile Strategy, setting out how the City will maximise the value and productivity of its underused and undeveloped sites. Plans will be developed for the delivery of pilot sites across the City.
 Work with partners to coordinate the delivery of the city’s Biodiversity Action Plan 2012-16.
 Review the Manchester Tree Strategy and Action Plan.
 Plant over 4,000 trees, providing opportunities for carbon sequestration, cooling
and flood management across the City.
 Continue to work with partners to deliver sustainable GI projects e.g. Nutsford Vale, Gorton South and Moston Brook, providing important opportunities for health and wellbeing and encouraging sustainable methods of transport.
 Finalise the designation of the city’s first Country Park and continue to identify new Sites of Biological Importance and Local Nature Reserves as applicable, protecting and enhancing biodiversity where appropriate.

5.6 Making It Happen – Embedding climate change in the City Council’s culture

5.6.1 Culture Change – In 2012/13 the Council will develop a programme of Carbon Literacy training and an increased Green Impact programme to increase the process of cultural change across the organisation.

5.6.2 Carbon Literacy
 The Manchester Carbon Literacy Programme will continue across the city with a launch in the autumn. Specific programmes for Elected Members and managers will be put in place.
 By the end of 2012, the independent Carbon Literacy Coordinating Body will have been established and a bank of marketing and training materials developed.
 Carbon Literacy training will have consistent core materials and adapted content relevant to where learners are, and an accredited certification scheme.
 Senior staff training will follow in 2012 and 2013, and it is aimed to run tailored programmes for staff as well as service specific staff such as: Carbon Literacy training for building managers and support staff, training for catering staff, training for project managers throughout 2013.

5.6.3 Campaigns – Green Impact
 Following a successful pilot, Manchester City Council will look to continue the Green Impact programme and look to treble the number of teams completing the workbook to 45. Work will be undertaken to ensure a significant increase in the number of teams participating in the programme.
 Workshops and training sessions will be carried out in a variety of locations across the Council’s estate, giving teams’ information in their surroundings and empowering them by showing what can be achieved within their departments.
 We will focus on a number of specific buildings and look at the impact of using Green Impact as a tool to reduce emissions.

5.7 Planning for our Future
5.7.1 Business Planning
 The current Business Planning process is being reviewed and it is planned that the Low-Carbon section will now be embedded into the Performance section of the Business Plan, ensuring it becomes seen as a key performance measure.
 Environmental Strategy will work with each of the Council’s Directorates to support them to develop their plans and agree actions for the coming year.
 Low-Carbon Leads have been identified in each Directorate and low-carbon groups will be formed where they are not currently in existence. Each Directorates performance will be continue to be assessed via quarterly carbon budgets and the lead officers will be responsible for reporting on their performance and implementing their plans.

5.7.2 Capital and Revenue Gateway
 Training will be developed for project managers within the Capital Programmes Group in order for them to understand and utilise low-carbon decision making when scoping, planning and delivering projects. This will be a ‘bolt on’ to the Carbon Literacy training that will be designed for all staff this year.

5.7.3 Finance
 Finance will continue to support the Council assessing and paying for its Carbon Reduction Commitment, in whatever form this takes. The process is currently under review by National Government.
 A carbon accounting tool for capital projects will be implemented, once it has been agreed which tool the Council should use. There are currently two options the Council could choose from; the first is to buy an off the shelf tool and the second is to develop its own. Once completed and implemented, all project managers will be trained how to use it and guidance created for all staff to utilise the system. It is envisaged, this will sit alongside the Prism system, which the Council uses to manage it current project documentation. This project will be scoped out and delivered in 2012/13.

5.8 Addressing Area-Based Working

5.8.1 With the adoption of an area based approach to integrated service delivery,
steps are being taken to begin the development of local programmes of awareness
raising and delivery. In 2012/13, engagement with governance and management
functions in each of the Strategic Regeneration Framework Areas will commence a
process of embedding carbon reduction activity in work programmes in future years.

5.8.2 To support this work each SRF area has undertaken a workshop and
developed a plan with key actions for the coming year included in each. In order to
ensure work is enabled to be delivered, an officer from the Environmental Strategy
service will be based in each of the SRF areas

5.9 ICT

5.9.1 The new ICT Data Centre at Sharp will be delivered during 2012. This facility,
being purpose built, is more energy efficient and in the build up to the move, 60% of
the server estate has been virtualised (over 200). Each virtualised server represents
approximately 75% reduction in energy used. ICT have undertaken a cost, benefit
analysis of introducing a tool to ensure all ICT hardware is turned off. This has
identified a potential return on investment in approximately 8-9 months and a
subsequent annual saving of over £50,000.

5.9.2 Going forward, once the Data Centre move to Sharp has been completed,
investigations will take place into the feasibility of virtualising further servers. The
implementation of a tool to switch off hardware has been included in the scope of an
existing ICT project, with an anticipated completion within financial year 2012/13.

5.9.3 ICT is also looking to become more involved in the Green Digital Charter, working alongside colleagues in the MDDA, to identify further and more innovative ways the service can contribute, not just within the Council, but throughout Manchester.

5.10 Carbon budgets and reporting
The Council is working toward its ambitious carbon targets. These were formally set through ‘Manchester City Council’s Climate Change Delivery Plan 2010-2020, the Council’s contribution to Manchester – A Certain Future.

5.10.1 Financial Savings

5.10.2 If the plan is delivered as outlined above the following savings will be achieved. From the buildings and energy programme:
 Asset rationalisation £248k
 Voltage Optimisers £125,000 per annum
 Galleries light management and £3,750
Total savings, based on last years costs if a 10% saving is achieved should be in the region of £860,000.

5.10.3 Council-wide targets

5.10.4 The Council’s ten-year Low Carbon Delivery Plan set a 20% target by April
2014, and 41% reduction in carbon emissions by April 2020 based on 2009/10 levels.
These targets were signed off by the Council’s Executive. Further to this is a political
will to further reduce emissions in 2011/12 by another 10% (on financial year
2011/12), in line with carbon budgets. Achieving this target would position the
Council within touching distance of the formal 20% target:

acrp2012fig7

 

 

 

acrp2012fig8

5.10.5 Interim and annual targets will be set as time progresses, and more data is
available to map usage and trends in the Council’s performance. There is a
significant gap between current emissions and the target in 2020/21; programmes of
work and interim targets will be developed as time progresses to meet overall carbon
reduction aims.

5.10.6 Directorate level targets 2012/13

5.10.7 Last year the Council introduced Carbon Budgets for its Directorates, using 2010/11 as a baseline. 2011/12 is the first year in which this data was monitored, aiming for a 10% reduction across all Directorates.

acrp2012fig9

5.10.8 As shown in the table above, directorate level reduction targets for 2011/12
were exceeded by Adults and Children’s directorates. The larger directorates,
Corporate Core and Neighbourhood Services were unable to reach the 10% target
individually. Collectively, emissions allocated to Directorates reduced by 6%.

5.10.9 Due to the composition of the Directorates and the number and scale of the
buildings they manage, emissions reduction within the larger portfolios (Corporate
Core and Neighbourhood Services – as shown in Figure 8), is proportionality less
than the smaller directorates. Where buildings have closed or improvements made in
these smaller directorates, it has had a larger impact on percentage change from
baseline.

5.10.10 A major focus of the Council’s carbon reduction strategy focuses on estate
rationalisation and improvements to existing building stock. Key decisions in this area
are currently taken at a corporate level. Details of the improvements throughout the
estate are listed in Section 3.

5.10.11 Work is now also starting to be conducted at Directorate level, and
Directorate’s support is needed to continue to reduce emissions; each Directorate is
now reporting regularly to the Environmental Strategy Programme Board (ESPB) on
progress within their estate and actions contained in their low carbon services plans.
An example of a critical action delivered by a Directorate can be seen through the
LED installation programme at Manchester Art Gallery.

5.10.12 Engagement of staff at Directorate level through culture change will also be
an important driver to reduce emissions.

5.10.13 It must be noted that a major factor in energy usage patterns is down to weather and/or prevailing temperatures. Milder temperatures experienced during the winter of 2011/12 compared to the previous year have lessened energy demand across the estate. The reduction in staffing numbers (see Section 4.6.2) is also likely to have had an impact on overall energy demand.

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