Discussion Group: Climate Change and BME Communities Project

This blog post is for participants of a project investigating how black and minority ethnic (BME) communities in Greater Manchester could be affected by climate change.

The project involves 16 different organisations supporting BME communities locally – from lunch clubs and arts organisations to faith groups and campaigners. After two initial workshops to unpack the issues, the organisations are now working with some of their
service users to help them understand the implications of our changing climate, and to get their views on what could and should be done in response.

Using the comment boxes below, project participants can share thoughts, questions, ideas and concerns about how they’re engaging the people they support.

If you’re not involved in the project yourself but have suggestions for the organisations taking part, please feel free to add your thoughts.

We’ll report back on how the participating organisations got on after the final project workshop on 6 November.

The project is led by the National Council for Voluntary Organisations. You can find out more on the NCVO website: http://www.ncvo-vol.org.uk/vulnerable-people-climate-change

Kate Damiral

About manchesterclimatemonthly

Was print format from 2012 to 13. Now web only. All things climate and resilience in (Greater) Manchester.
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7 Responses to Discussion Group: Climate Change and BME Communities Project

  1. Hi everyone,
    Hope all is well with you and your organisation. Hope your finding time to plan and deliver your climate change project with your service users. This may sound daunting, but remember it doesn’t have to be too big. I made that mistake. I planned a two hour workshop for a group of children aged 6-12 years. I packed far too much in. Here’s my session plan – some of it might be useful for you to use:-
    10:00-10:05
    Introduction – Climate Change – Raise awareness about climate change and the affects it’s having on our communities. Photo consent forms
    10:05 – 10:20 – 15mins
    ICEBREAKER – Water mix and match game. Split into small groups. http://www.globalactionplan.org.uk/ecoteams/take-action
    10:20 – 10:25 – 5mins
    What do you know about climate change? – Flipchart paper and pens
    Each child writes what they know on the paper
    10:25 – 10:30 – 5mins
    Global Warning for Kids – youtube video
    10:30 – 10:50 – 20mins
    Manchester Climate Change Drivers – powerpoint
    Discuss each driver – What implication does this have on Manchester?
    10:50 – 10:55
    The human impact on this earth – youtube video
    10:55 – 11:00 5 MIN BREAK
    11:00-12:00
    Design and produce a poster – warning people of the effects of climate change?
    Paints – feltips, pencils, rubber, rulers, paint pallets, aprons, brushes
    2:45 – 1:00 – Evaluation
    The practical elements, water game and designing the poster was the most engaging and enjoyable for this age group. My session was too long and parts of it was not suitable for the age group, so they became distracted and bored.
    However they did ask a lot of questions. On reflection I would of felt more confident and equipped if I had wider knowledge and understanding of subjects relating to climate change i.e. fossil fuel, reducing carbon emissions, green infrastructure, mitigation and adaptation.etc.

  2. Hi everyone,
    Hope all is well with you and your organisation. Hope your finding time to plan and deliver your climate change project with your service users. This may feel daunting, but remember it doesn\’t have to be too big. I made that mistake. I planned a two hour workshop for a group of children aged 6-12 years. I packed far too much in. Have a look at my session plan – some of it might be useful for you to use:-
    10:00-10:05
    Introduction – Climate Change – Raise awareness about climate change and the affects it\’s having on our communities. Photo consent forms
    10:05 – 10:20 – 15mins
    ICEBREAKER – Water mix and match game. Split into small groups. http://www.globalactionplan.org.uk/ecoteams/take-action
    10:20 – 10:25 – 5mins
    What do you know about climate change? – Flipchart paper and pens
    Each child writes what they know on the paper
    10:25 – 10:30 – 5mins
    Global Warning for Kids – youtube video
    10:30 – 10:50 – 20mins
    Manchester Climate Change Drivers – powerpoint
    Discuss each driver – What implication does this have on Manchester?
    10:50 – 10:55
    The human impact on this earth – youtube video
    10:55 – 11:00 5 MIN BREAK
    11:00-12:00
    Design and produce a poster – warning people of the effects of climate change?
    Paints – feltips, pencils, rubber, rulers, paint pallets, aprons, brushes
    2:45 – 1:00 – Evaluation
    The practical elements and group work, i.e. water game and designing the poster, was the most engaging and enjoyable for this age group. My session was too long and parts of it – the drivers power point was not suitable for the age group, so they became distracted and bored.
    However, they did ask a lot of questions. On reflection I would of felt more confident and equipped if I had wider knowledge and understanding of subjects relating to climate change i.e. fossil fuel, reducing carbon emissions, green infrastructure, mitigation and adaptation.etc.
    If your planning on delivering to children, your session should last no longer than an hour. It needs to be hands on, practical and fun!!

    Look forward to seeing and hearing from you all!!

    Michelle Ayavoro

    • Thanks Michelle,
      that looks really useful!!

      I too suffer from the “can’t answer that question” thing – sometimes I get them to write them down and then go ask experts – but it is pretty time-intensive!! Perhaps, though, if we did that and then shared the knowledge on a “frequently asked questions” page? What think you?

      Marc Hudson

      • Nice suggestion Marc, great idea!! I can’t remember the questions I was asked:( as my session was full on busy, but it’s a great idea to write them down (so at least you DO remember them:)
        If this takes shape we need to inform the other organisations before they deliver their sessions!!

        Michelle Ayavoro

  3. Kate Damiral says:

    Thanks for sharing how your session went, Michelle. It’s useful to know that the 7 ‘climate drivers’ we are using for this project (described on the project blog – see website link above) weren’t suitable for children.

    Perhaps these flashcards showing pictures of different types of weather and knock-on effects like flooding and drought might be an easier way in to talking about climate impacts with kids: http://www.greeninfrastructurenw.co.uk/climatechange/training.htm (see 1a)

    As you’re working with young people, the Development Education Project in Manchester may also be able to suggest some useful materials for future sessions: http://www.dep.org.uk/projects/current-projects/teach-climate-change/

    Were the YouTube videos you found any good?

  4. As for the YouTube videos, I thought they were OK, but when the group watched them, they were distracted by the cartoon character in the first one (slightly inappropriate behaviour, although it was meant to be funny) and they became bored with the other. Here’s the links, let me now what you think…..

    I think there’s a need to create our own children’s version!! This would be a great project with the group with the right budget!

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